FAITH FRIENDLY WEB

ANTIRA
BLOG FOR GOD
GOLDEN RULE ADVOCACY
MAGNANAMAS
REMINDER VERSE®
THE LIGHT MINISTRIES
TheChristianChroniclesC100
previous arrow
next arrow

Popular

500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
500px DUAL FREE TO BE LOGO black letters
previous arrow
next arrow

Trending

OPTIONS MARKET

Brad Pitt Channel
Viola Davis Channel
Denzel Washington Channel
Jamie Lee Curtis Channel
Bradley Cooper Channel
Cate Blanchett Channel
Jason Statham Channel
Anya Chalotra Channel
Colin Farrell Channel
Meryl Streep Channel
Morgan Freeman Channel
Nicole Kidman Channel
Idris Elba Channel
Scarlett Johansson Channel
Benedict Cumberbatch Channel
Gina Carano Channel
Keanu Reeves Channel
Constance Wu Channel
Kevin Hart Channel
Amy Adams Channel
Laurence Fishburne Channel
Letitia Wright Channel
Liam Neeson Channel
Emilia Clarke Channel
Mark Ruffalo Channel
Diana Silvers Channel
Matthew McConaughey Channel
Betty Gilpin Channel
Tom Cruise Channel
Elizabeth Debicki Channel
Tom Hanks Channel
Alba Baptista Channel
Will Smith Channel
Zoe Saldana Channel
Hugh Jackman Channel
Brianna Hildebrand Channel
Gary Oldman Channel
Aya Cash Channel
Christian Bale Channel
previous arrow
next arrow
Purchase an Option on a Celebrity channel now for $X
and transfer it to the Celebrity later for $X+.

RECOMMENDED

Declaration of a Peaceful Revolution

Liberals’ gamble in calling an early vote unlikely to be rewarded with a majority

“There’s going to be a lot of acrimony in that Parliament.”

Article content

The Liberals steamed toward victory late Monday in an election fought in the midst of a rebounding pandemic, but the party’s gamble in calling an early vote looked like it would not be rewarded with a majority.

Advertisement

Article content

The Conservatives began the night with some gains in Atlantic Canada but were unable to make a breakthrough despite the near dead-heat between the two leading parties in opinion polling.

The NDP made modest gains at the end of the brief, 35-day race, carried out at a cost of $600 million.

With results coming in from all 338 House of Commons seats by 12:30 p.m. ET, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s party was leading in 157 ridings, exactly the same as their seat count in the 2019 election.

The Conservatives were ahead in 122 constituencies — one more than last time — the Bloc Quebecois 31, the NDP 26 and the Green Party two.

As occurred when they lost two years ago, the Tories actually surpassed the Liberals in popular vote — 34 to 32 per cent — but with support less evenly distributed across the country.

Advertisement

Article content

Erin O’Toole, the Conservative leader, blasted Trudeau for calling the election in the first place, suggesting he would lead the country into another vote in less than two years to try again for a majority.

“Tonight Canadians did not give Mr. Trudeau the majority mandate he wanted,” O’Toole told party faithful in Oshawa, Ont. “In fact, Canadians sent him back with another minority at a cost of $600 millions and deeper divisions in the country.”

Former Conservative cabinet minister Lisa Raitt put the complaint more bluntly on CBC TV.

“I got a really funny text from a friend tonight. He said this was a $600 million cabinet shuffle,” she said. “There’s going to be a lot of acrimony in that Parliament.”

In Atlantic Canada where the first polls closed, the party put some dents in the usual Liberal fortress – raising party hopes but failing to provide the kind of boost needed for victory.

Advertisement

Article content

The Liberals carried 26 of the region’s 32 ridings in the 2019 election, and all of them in 2015. By late evening, the party was elected or leading in 23 seats — a drop of three — while the Conservatives were ahead in nine, a potential pickup of five constituencies.

For a short while, the Conservatives led in two Newfoundland ridings and remained in a see-saw battle in one of them, a surprise even to some in the party.

“It’s not expected, quite frankly,” said Raitt. “I’m not going to get too excited yet, but it’s really nice to see the numbers roll in.”

As it turns out, she was right to be cautious.

But it seemed unclear whether the Liberals had much to celebrate themselves, any ambitions they had for winning a majority dashed.

Advertisement

Article content

“The people have spoken,” Jody Wilson-Raybould, the former Liberal justice minister who butted heads with Trudeau over the SNC-Lavalin affair, told CTV. “People are going to have to work together …Canadians are speaking about the need not to have absolute power.”

A prominent member of the Liberal cabinet, Maryam Monsef, was defeated in her Peterborough-Kawartha riding. Fisheries and Oceans Minister Bernadette Jordan lost in Nova Scotia’s South Shore-St. Margarets.

The People’s Party of Canada led by controversial populist Maxime Bernier saw its popular vote rise to 5.2 per cent, but neither Bernier nor any of the PPC’s other candidates actually won a place in the Commons.

It appeared the party may, though, have cut into Conservative support in some ridings.

Advertisement

Article content

It was a bitter evening for the Greens, especially Leader Annamie Paul. The party was headed to winning two seats, one less than in 2019, while Paul herself finished fourth in her Toronto-Centre riding.

“I will tell you that I am certainly disappointed. It is hard to lose, no one likes to lose,” said the leader, who has had to battle a rebellion within her own party. “But I am so proud of the effort, the creativity, the innovation that our team brought to this race.”

Few voters wanted the election, surveys suggested, and no single issue dominated it, except maybe the performance and popularity of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

But if Trudeau’s Liberals had dreamed of regaining a majority in Parliament, that hope quickly dimmed, the party slipping into a near dead-heat with the Conservatives under Leader Erin O’Toole.

Advertisement

Article content

Jagmeet Singh’s New Democratic Party picked up ground, while the Greens and Bloc Quebecois seemed headed to more disappointing outcomes.

Buoyed by a minority of Canadians opposed to COVID-19 restrictions, the People’s Party of Canada under former Conservative Maxime Bernier also climbed in opinion surveys, raising the possibility of splitting the right-of-centre vote.

Much of the focus is on battleground ridings in vote-rich Ontario and B.C., which was shaping up to be a close, three-way race between the top two parties and NDP.

But it was unclear when the final results would even be known, given the need to count as many as a million mail-in ballots, a process that Elections Canada said wouldn’t begin until Tuesday. In-person callot counts Monday emerged slowly as COVID-19 protocols bogged down some polling stations.

Advertisement

Article content

At the same time, though, about 5.8 million people voted in advance polls.

The mounting cost of living, Canada’s scrambling exit from Afghanistan, Quebec’s racial attitudes and how best to handle the burden of COVID-19 itself were among the issues that heated up the campaign.

The nastiness that has often marked politics in the pandemic era also reared its head, with COVID-skeptic protesters hurling abuse and even stones at Trudeau.

The last election was only two years ago in 2019, when the Liberal government saw its majority trimmed to a minority, Canadians’ early enthusiasm for Trudeau having already waned. Under current legislation, the next one didn’t have to come until 2023.

When the writ was dropped on Aug. 15, the prime minister insisted that voters needed a chance to pick who should guide the country out of the worst public-health in a century.

Advertisement

Article content

Opposition critics were unconvinced, labeling the election a bald attempt to shoot for another majority at a time when the Liberals still enjoyed a reasonable lead in the opinion polls.

As Parliament dissolved, Trudeau’s party held 155 seats, the Conservatives 119, the NDP 24, the Bloc 32 and the Green Party two. Parties need to win at least 170 ridings to secure a majority in the 338-seat House of Commons.

Whether because of bad luck or poor judgement by the Liberals, the call came on the same day that the Taliban capped a lightning-fast advance by capturing Kabul and taking over Afghanistan.

What followed was a chaotic withdrawal by Western countries, as thousands of Afghans sought to escape from what they feared would be a vengeful new regime.

Advertisement

Article content

The federal government came under intense criticism from veterans groups for doing too little, too late to evacuate Afghan interpreters and others who had worked for the Canadian military and government. In the end, Canadian Forces moved 3,700 people out of the country on military cargo planes, but admitted it had left thousands behind.

As the evacuation effort unfolded, the Liberals saw their five-percentage-point advantage in the polls dissolve away. Within a couple of weeks they were virtually tied with the Conservatives.

But O’Toole faced headwinds himself early in the campaign.

After the party faced stiff criticism for a promise to repeal the Liberals’ 2020 ban on assault-style guns, the leader reversed that position on the campaign trail, saying the ban would, in fact, stay in place if he became prime minister.

Advertisement

Article content

COVID-19 percolated throughout the election, initially as a knock against the Liberals for launching the campaign while the nation was still consumed with fighting the pandemic.

There was relatively little difference in the parties’ approach, though the Liberals emphasized a plan to require all federal employees to be vaccinated and the Conservatives pushed the idea of tighter testing for international visitors.

But the worsening fourth wave in Alberta — blamed largely on the province lifting public-health restrictions too quickly and widely — turned the tables some.

As hospitals teetered at the brink of over-capacity and Premier Jason Kenney re-instituted some controls, the Liberals were quick to point out that O’Toole had earlier praised his fellow Conservative for skilled management of the pandemic.

The Tories, meanwhile, hammered the Liberals for what they portrayed as profligate spending, which raised the federal debt to over $1 trillion for the first time. O’Toole said his government would balance the budget in 10 years with a plan that depends in part on robust economic growth.

Advertisement

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

Releted Posts

Find Almost Anything Locally

Loading the adverslides

Please wait a while